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20110701
20110731
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SFGTV2 799
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English 799
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 799 (some duplicates have been removed)
have seen the wall at the base. >> the big steel beams with the fence. this is an effective way of preventing the rock that does fall from causing damage. that might protect the bottom of the hill but it doesn't do anything over the hill. >> it has long been my understanding that the city of san francisco says and the building department takes this position that there is no one buildable lot -- unbuildable lot. i wonder if this is realistic. >> if money is an issue, we can develop solutions that will mitigate the impact. that a solution can be eliminating the hill, that can eliminate the problem. or build a structure right into the hill so there is no longer an exposed face or bold enough of iraq together so that it acts as a big buttress to prevent further movement. -- or hold enough of the rock together so that it acts as a big buttress. we are allowing the wall of the building to act as a retaining structure. there was a time when we did not get any. there was an epic one before in 1982. we brought with us and rainfall charge. >> you were saying that this is somehow correlate
're still sleeping. how can i get it done. i should have brought a big bag or something like that. any way i just put his head - and then then stash him in my kimono. i can't get in front of them. easy. this is a big hour. my next victim. [snickering quietly] next. bet i capture 150. my body is full of many herring. [laughing] where is my robe. it's missing. a temple god must have taken my ladder away. the man started pacing back and forth wondering how to get down. so, the sunlight made one of the birds wake up. bird:i can't breathe. so i must be catching a bad cold. i drank too much, saki rice wine last night. was a little tipsy. i don't remember. any way. think can't move. someone is leaning on me so who is it. my cousin. my brother. we've been got by a hunter. hey! my cousin, wake up. no. not a good morning. we've been caught by a hunter. pass the word but be quiet okay. okay. wake up, wake up, wake up. wake up. wake up. wake up. wake up. wake up. wake up. hey! did you wake up? we've been caught by a hunter. right. i got a good plan. just do what i say. at the count of three, you flap y
is called big thicket. jasper, texas. >> to big thicket a crack is a buck shot, a stick broke, cracked headlights. crack, the big thicket we go 2 sticks. drink, drink, light, light. stagger in the road. statistic o statistic broke. the light, buck shot light. >> buck on stagger. what you looking at. the white stick. along the trees, along the trees. the buck staggering home. the crack. big thicket. what are you doing here? >> stick broke. white light. break for home. white homing. ha, ha, go, go, buck shot, kra e crack, crack, crack. hit lights. what you think you are. >> ha, ha, stick broke. in the brushes. in the rushes. put them back on. bufks head in the rushes. put them back on. to big thicket we go, hot we go to hit staggeringly along the frees. crack, a steak broke. we go, go, go, buck shot. we go, go, go. up the road. road kill. staggering bucks. head light rushes. pick up brushes. race broke, screeching. the big thicket we go, buck shot, crack. the road kills. crack e a broke stick. on we go on. [applause] >> omni bus program. and choose to muses are exciting because they
/khrarpblgs us. you have the big main. usually there are 60 or a hundred or 50. the little guys are 20-15-30. if you want to shut off the power you shut off the little guys first than the main. when you throw a switch there is the arch. like water when water flows in an old house any you shut it off quick you get the hammer effect? that's like electricity. is it safe to do it if you smell natural gas? show of hands. >> nobody has their hands up. it's not safe to flicking any switches if you smell natural gas. how about if there is smoke coming out of an outlet. if you shut this off in an area where there is no gas, good idea. >> just about anything can be a hazardous material, cleaners, solvants, hair products anything can be hazardous. they are every where. the only time they are hazardous if they are misused our there is a disaster. do you see these in san francisco? that's probably propane. we have a port. in an industrial area. it identified where they are stored. are there hazardous storage places in this air? no. are there a dry cleaners? yes. who remembers grand auto. they ha
. very good. wow. what is that. the lake. not the lake. big river. wow. what? many bridges. the bridge is very old. so, don't go plenty more all right. so. this is a real birds eye view. very good. someone is flying like me. i remember his face in my japanese history book. his real name is,foto shim. hi. good to see you. so, many messengers down there. so, they are waiving you. why are they waiving me. to take me. the end of my life. i'm dying now. oh, my god. so, any way i don't want to - that the river. must be the sticks i don't want to cross the sticks and die because i have no money. so, six months for currency in japan. cost of six bucks. i have no money so see you later. hey! so go to this. go to the east. [birds chirping] any way i'm safe as long as i still with birds. okay. wow. what's that coming towards me. okay. i should grab it. a kind of pole. hey, hey! i'm safe. so, any way, let's get to the - got to get out of here. go. get out of here. where am i? whoa this morning the sunrise is very beautiful. that mountain. i'm still in japan. wow i'm lucky. and there's a pla
wrecking houses. there were building two a day -- they were building two with a. the 1930's were the big boom times for the sunset. >> this is a recession. >> these are the homes in west would park. -- in westwood park. >> how did this perform? the composite the assembly -- come's assembly -- composite assembly. >> they would stucco it. they would put chicken wire on it. >> when i inspect buildings that are being remodeled, i see that the chicken wire mesh is completely gone. >> it is galvanized. the saltwater was enough to rest it out. >> it people think stucco is waterproof -- it is not waterproof. it sucks the water in. you have to water protect it and paint it. >> the above the low medium that was going on -- the bungalow frenzy that was going on, people were building houses at a remarkable rate in the 1930's. nothing down. you can pay us later. we have to sell this. this is shared in school and the ocean view that it -- this is shariton school and the ocean view dedication. these early neighborhoods, this is 1910, they would have to do a lot of things themselves. the first school wa
to make their own instruments. >> (speaking spanish). >> so they use the surroundings and big jars and they used to have water or other type was drinks. >> (speaking spanish). >> covered with leather skin. >> (speaking spanish). >> and they make the drums. >>. >> (speaking spanish). (drums). (applause). >> (speaking spanish). >> this instrument is called dungo. >> spr (speaking spanish). >> we have two but only one was used. >> (speaking spanish). >> this is one that was used north of the capital. >> (speaking spanish). >> in the cities of the country >> (speaking spanish). >> when he was a child he was able to see those instruments and on extension today. (drums). (applause) . >> this is a donkey's jaw. it could be a horse or a donkey. >> donkey's jaw. >> and it's played by spiking it and to make the rattle sound and also creates this. (applause). >> (speaking spanish) sorry. (speaking spanish). >> this is the kahita and it is created as the -- i don't know that word. how do you say that? the piggy bank. you know where the boxes and the churches collect money? yeah. this is
. >> there ago. maybe there are more. >> we have a big article on race tracks on our website. outsidelands.org. >> the ingleside, you can still see that. >> they developed where that race track was, just south of ocean avenue, they kept the oval of the race track and created urbano drive. >> i think we have some progress of that. >> that is the inner sunset. that is where >> lawrence lives > i do. >> you can see the inner sandbank. it is a big old sand hill. they had to do a lot of grading. >> in the building department, when we go out and look to people to building development, as soon as they squared away the top 6 inches or whatever is there, it is all sand. forever. in my yard, and there is nothing you can do about it. it is what there is. it was generally developed in response to the 1890's for mid- winter there, which was held in golden gate park. would the first buildings that was built in that area was a bar called the little shamrock, and it is still there just west of lincoln, just west from ninth avenue. it was built to help service people who were working on the big winter fair
, but it was three decades. this is sunset boulevard being put in. there were putting in this big boulevard. it is pointing out a goalie in the middle of the sand. -- a gully in the middle of the sand. >> woody was just given this time. >> i have been wanting one of these for years. i know they were at 5300. >> the building is still there. >> they were not the most enlightened company. they were strict about not showing homes to minorities. they got in trouble for that. willie brown actually made his name by going and trying to see one of the homes. it was a very political thing. he would walk up with a whole bunch of people in the person showing the home would sneak away. >> even in the teens, there were a lot of neighborhoods that had restrictions against certain groups of people. >> this was in the 1950's. willie mays had trouble buying a house in san francisco. a couple of people would not show him a house. they had to enlist the mayor and a bunch of people. this is their reservoir. companies would take a block and there would start wrecking houses. there were building two a day -- they
quake, where the tempered glass actually kept the building together. it was acting like plywood. big surprise. the tempered caught right at the frames and it was the tempered clearly that was keeping everything together. the building was going this way, and the glass was acting almost like a sheer wall. other times it totally collaps collapsed. seismically, ooh, that's a laurence question. >> they have limits on what both the transient drift and permanent drift is allowed to be, how far they are allowed to sway and how far they're allowed to be out of plumb. what they calculate it to be they come up with a resilient system of setting the glazing so that at the levels of drift there should be no pressure placed against the glazing. so that's the design. we will wait for a big earthquake and see how it plays out. but should be okay. the drift issues are things that we've been talking about for these high rise buildings. what are appropriate drift limits, and how much can a 600 foot building be permanently displaced and still be an acceptable building. how long can we expect the glazing
used the parameters of this space to find relationships between the work that is not out in the big gallery. >> i noticed a lot of artists doing really site-specific work. >> this is a pile of balloons, something that is so familiar, like a child's balloon. in this proportion, suddenly, it becomes something out of a dream. >> or a nightmare. >> may be a nightmare. >> this one over here is even harder to figure out what the initial material is. >> this is made out of puffy paint. often, kids use it to decorate their clothes. she has made all these lines of paint. >> for the pieces we are looking at, is there a core of foam or something in the middle of these pieces that she built on top of? >> i'm not telling. >> ah, a secret. >> this silver is aluminum foil, crumbled of aluminum foil. her aesthetic is very much that quiet, japanese spatial thing that i really admire. their attention to the materiality of the things of the world. >> this is a nice juxtaposition you have going on right now. you have a more established artists alongside and emerging artists. is that something important
of the east-west one's with explorers -- ones with explorers. there was a big complaint about the spanish names. a few of them they kept. these are the park side cottages. as early as 1908, they had a textbook and they said, you can build as cottage. we will give you the plans. take it away. we think about it later, but they were doing it early. >> this is a placard from one of those cooky cutter homes. we talk about housing today. i have two work days. this is 600927 -- 6927. they put them on the building of that authority could figure out what you were buying. >> you will see these placards. this is 1930. you can see that it was sand, sand, sand. >> there were train tracks that unloaded in front of us development site. -- in front of this development site. >> these three houses, can you see them? they are still there. people were optimistic. they would buy three lots and say, we will build three two- story houses here and eventually it will fill in. it did, but it was three decades. this is sunset boulevard being put in. there were putting in this big boulevard. it is pointing out a goa
situation. for example, if there is homeless youth, that is a big challenge for some in the community. >> [inaudible] they should be more money placed into education because the youth are the future and what not. [inaudible] >> carter ortiz is crucial. >> [inaudible] supporting non-profit organizations and looking into them and trying to support them financially and beat and arrested and held out with that. i know there are a lot of organizations in san francisco, but that is the problem sometimes. [inaudible] it is those who are offering funding really looking into the organizations and asking what we're doing. come to organizations. see what we are about. >> i think use in the workforce needs to be tacked on because -- youth in the work force needs to be tacked on because they have seen their parents get laid off and has seen the effects of not having financial stability. now they are taking the burden upon themselves to wanting a job and wanting to step out into work themselves, so if they had more solid job training and actual jobs that could stick with them throughout their high-
that figure this out are going to be big winners, and they are going to change the way we think of them, the way we relate to them, the way we buy from them, all of that. that is what the future holds. i see the floor. >> thank you. i think the best questions are yet to come, and we are going to turn it over to the audience. >> we would like to remind our listening and viewing audience that this is a program with the commonwealth club of california on the future of cloud computing. our thanks to our distinguished panel for their comments here today. now, we open the floor for a q&a session. we will be passing around a microphone, so if you have questions, please raise your hand and speak into the microphone. >> i have a key question about the backup plan. you mentioned the super bowl earlier. what is the backup plan in the unlikely catastrophic event of the disabling of the system? solar storm or whatever. >> there are lots of things that can go wrong. the rights can hit the planet, and the things go dark, and then we fix it. in general, the technology you are talking about is something
, big brother, friend, someone you can look up to. lack of support from them, just the environment you grow up in. a lot of environments that youth are growing up in now are not what it should be. >> i would say huge barrier would be gender orientation discrimination. there should be more culturally competent training for youth service providers. anyone who works with youth should be adequately trained in order for there to be a better overall community. >> i would say adequate schooling in the juvenile justice system. with teachers also being culturally competent and aware of what students are going through. you have their undivided attention. i know behavior might play a difference, but if they are incarcerated, there are not a lot of parenting programs. those things are taken a way at a time in their life when all they have to do is think, so i think it would be a good idea to have those. >> adding on to that, the juvenile justice system, i think there should be more of a focus on restorative justice. so you give kids an alternative route and a second chance instead of locking them
. it is too high and too big. we would like to see heights up to -- that do not exceed 55 feet. there is -- we said the same thing. there is a solar water array on the roof. there is a pair pat -- parapet and popups with the elevator shaft. those did not show up on drawings we had seen. we are wondering if the community groups that did sign on for this project are aware of the horrendous height. this is 72 feet to 84 feet. something may be familiar with that we did in 2006 was our balloon test. this is where we flew balloons at an 85-foot height. we extrapolated where the existing zoning was and where the new zoning would be and we ended up with 68 feet. it is very large. even if the colors to go toward the color of the background, the high rises, you see how it overwhelms everything that is there. this is not mission bay. this is the other side of the freeway. this is not mission square. we have the height of the brick buildings. this is porterville -- potrero hill. we want to meet with the developer and get a project we can all be proud of. >> president olague: thank you. >> good afternoon,
against those in your district. >> we definitely have a few big projects for issues -- or issues we're paying a lot of attention to and we will continue to devote a lot of attention to, both myself and my staff. one of biggest ones is the planned development of the new campus for california and pacific medical center. that has dominated a lot of city-wide dialogue in the past few years. that project is slated to go forward or get through the entitlement process this year in city hall. if you are not familiar, we currently have a california campus and a pacific campus, and the plan is to build a bigger campus and consolidate those services into one larger hospital at the old cathedral hill spa on van ness, and that is going to have a huge impact, both in terms of the neighborhood in district 2, not only the new campus, but what happens to the pacific and california campus. also, is a huge job creator. we're making sure to do it in a way to we have every constituent buy into the project, create a ton of new jobs, and move forward with a health care system that benefits all of us. othe
so that they are stable and do not drain the general fund. that is a big aspect of it. another huge issue is the deferred maintenance on our infrastructure. we have a lot of infrastructure that has been deteriorating because we have not maintained properly. that includes roads, sewer systems, muni. we need to be much more diligent about maintaining our infrastructure. some of the big citywide issues that impact the district include transportation. we had more muni service and some other districts. it is not always reliable. some of the major bus lines in the district are not reliable. we have major projects like the renovation of delores park. it is an opportunity to define what the park is and what changes we want to make to it. that is going to be and port project, the same thing with glen canyon that is going to undergo a lot of work. one of the most challenging parts of the new district supervisor is that we elect the supervisors by district. it is very important to pay attention to the district, be engaged in the projects in the district. we also represent the whole city. any d
three or four weeks, we see a big tree case. i don't want palm trees on my treat. i want a six-foot box. everybody is very strongly felt about trees, i think. it happens constantly. >> it really brings out people's passions, which, as an -- as a forester, i'm always gratified to see. >> you're passionate. >> but this are also a -- oftentimes conflicts between trees and properties and developing a property, putting in a garage, you happen to have a tree in front of your house, you want to build a garage, you have to get a permit to take it out, we may not grant it automaticly, it can be a process that is challenging. >> we won't issue a permit to put in a garage or a curb cut, that requires a removal of the tree, until we get the tree removal permit first. so there's not a fate i've got my garage built and you can't have the tree standing in the way. >> used to happen a lot. the trees were, everybody forgot about us and then the garage was there, and people would say, you can't tell me i can't use my garage. >> then the little streets, how who is responsible for the trees and gardens and
had an attendant that would take a passenger's request and then operate the car. the big change was the emergence of a electric elevators. starting in 1880, the electric elevator allowed building dollars to go much higher. we evolved from steam hydraulic elevators to the electric elevators that are not that much different from what we are going to see now at the top of the tower. this is the steam room on the top of the state st. francis. -- on top of the state francis. the equipment you see painted green, that is all the original equipment from 1972. we are just now in the middle of modernizing this equipment. >> why modernize? doesn't the equipment works fine? >> it does, it is of analog and intensive, and there are some additional controls. let me introduce the foreman to you. this is vince. he can do a better job explaining the project details. >> what is happening here, what are you doing? >> we are doing a major modernization. we are tearing out the old system, logic controls, and generator controls, and we will be going over to solid state. this is not your standard selec
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 799 (some duplicates have been removed)

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